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Museum of Art

  1. Papercutting Virtual Workshop

    April 6, 2021, 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM @ Spaces are limited and registrations for the workshop must be made by Saturday, March 27. Supplies are being provided and will be available for pickup at the Museum of Art. This workshop is intended for adults ages 18 and up and will involve the use of a

    The Las Cruces Museum of Art is hosting a workshop on Islamic geometric papercutting with artist Mindy Shapiro. This workshop is brought to you through a collaboration between the Museum of Art and the Guild of American Papercutters. Registrations for the workshop must be made by Saturday, March 27. Supplies are being provided and will be available for pickup at the Museum of Art. This workshop is intended for adults ages 18 and up and will involve the use of a hobby knife to cut a design from a paper template. Papercutting is an ancient art form with original papercuts dating back to the 6th century in China. Since that time, artisans have used paper, scissors, and knives to create objects both ornamental and functional. Perhaps you made a snowflake in grade school or have seen silhouettes. These are forms of papercutting. Mindy Shapiro, MA, is a Papercutting, Zentangle® and book artist whose groundbreaking creativity, intricate designs and use of color distinguish her as an ar

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Museum of Nature Science

  1. “Quasi-crystalline Geometry in Islamic Art and Architecture"

    April 6, 2021, 3:00 PM @ Please contact Stephanie at shawkins@las-cruces.org to request a link to the program or go to https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84737728915 at the scheduled time.

    Ancient Islamic patterns with quasi-crystalline properties have triggered significant discussion and a number of debates on the scientific relevance of Islamic geometry. Astonishingly, eight centuries before their discovery in modern science, ancient artists created patterns with quasi-crystalline geometry. The discovery of “forbidden symmetries” in the 1980s shook the bedrock of theoretical solid-state science, prompting a foundational shift in the understanding of crystallography. Three decades after their initial discovery hundreds of quasi-crystalline formations have been uncovered; however, a full understanding of their generating principles and long-range structural order is still posing many challenges. Dr. Ajlouni will introduce the simple relational method that was used to construct these ancient formations using a compass and a straightedge.

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