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March 12, 2020 11:49 AM

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New Mexico Department of Health 1-855-600-3453

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Latest Update:

February 25, 2021 8:21 AM

Governor, state officials
to give COVID-19 update

SANTA FE – Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham and state officials will host a fully remote news conference tomorrow afternoon to provide an update on COVID-19 in New Mexico.

WHAT: Remote news conference with state officials
WHEN: Thursday, February 25, 3:30 P.M.

Please note: The governor is scheduled to take part in a remote conference with President Joe Biden as part of the National Governors Association Winter Meeting prior to tomorrow’s press conference, which may slightly affect the start time. We will aim to begin the press conference as close to 3:30 P.M. as possible, but it may be slightly delayed pending the timing of that conference.

The news conference will be streamed live on the governor’s Facebook page.

Members of the media will be able to participate remotely. If you would like the opportunity to ask questions, please RSVP to nora.sackett@state.nm.us with your name and media affiliation and “RSVP” in the subject or body of the email. After your RSVP is received, you will receive more information about how to participate.

Prior Updates

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February 25, 2021 7:15 AM

Department of Health county map update Feb. 24:
More counties reach Yellow, Green Levels
Only 4 counties at highest-risk Red Level, down from 14 two weeks past

SANTA FE – The New Mexico Department of Health on Wednesday announced the updated statewide COVID-19 map for the two-week period beginning Feb. 24, with 19 New Mexico counties at the Yellow Level and six at the Green Level, at which there are fewer restrictions on commercial and day-to-day activities amid decreased virus risk.

Four counties reached the Turquoise Level, the newly designated least-restrictive level, and four counties were at the Red Level, signifying very high risk.

Every county in the state now reports a positivity rate below 10 percent, close to the threshold for moving to a less restrictive level.

The state’s county-by-county system uses key health metrics – the per-capita daily incidence of new COVID-19 cases and average COVID-19 test positivity within county borders – to determine the level of public health risk and requirement for each county. A county that meets one criterion may operate at the Yellow Level; a county that meets both may operate at the Green Level. A county that has met both for two consecutive biweekly map updates may operate at the Turquoise Level.

Counties that met one of the health metric thresholds and may operate at the Yellow Level beginning Feb. 24 are: Bernalillo, Chaves, Cibola, Colfax, Curry, Grant, Guadalupe, Hidalgo, Lea, Lincoln, Luna, Rio Arriba, Roosevelt, San Juan, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Socorro and Valencia.

Counties that met both of the health metric thresholds and may operate at the Green Level beginning Feb. 24 are: De Baca, Los Alamos, Mora, Quay, Taos and Torrance.

Counties that met both of the health metric thresholds for two consecutive biweekly map updates and may operate at the Turquoise Level beginning Feb. 24 are: Catron, Harding, Sierra and Union.

Counties that met neither of the health metric thresholds and must operate at the Red Level are: Doña Ana, Eddy, McKinley and Otero.

Doña Ana had reached the Yellow Level with a positivity rate of 4.33 percent as of Feb. 10 but regressed, with a positivity rate of 6.77 percent as of Feb. 24; in accordance with the operative public health order, a county that moves to a more restrictive level must begin operating at the more restrictive level within 2 days.

The counties of Colfax (9.6), Curry (9.7), Hidalgo (8.4), Lea (9.6), Roosevelt (9) and Santa Fe (8.3) are each near the threshold for new per-capita cases of fewer than 8 per 100,000, which, when reached, in conjunction with keeping their positivity rates below 5 percent, will permit them to operate at the Green Level.

Thirty of 33 counties saw their new per-capita daily case rate improve over the two-week period, and all but six counties saw their positivity rates improve over the two-week period.

The color-coded tier system – Red Level, Yellow Level and Green Level – enables counties to shed restrictions and provide local communities the flexibility to operate more day-to-day activities as soon as public health data show the virus is retreating within their borders.

The public health order, the red-to-green framework and frequently asked questions are all available at cv.nmhealth.org/redtogreen, where New Mexicans can also view the test positivity rate and new case incidence for each county.

The categories and definitions for each risk level are available below and available at cv.nmhealth.org/redtogreen.

TURQUOISE LEVEL:

Counties at the Turquoise Level have both a new COVID-19 case incidence rate of no greater than 8 cases per 100,000 inhabitants during the most recent four-week period, and an average percent of positive COVID-19 test results over the most recent four-week period less than or equal to 5%.

Essential businesses (non-retail): No capacity restrictions but operations must be limited to only those absolutely necessary to carry out essential functions
Essential retail spaces: 75% of maximum capacity (indoor and outdoor)
Food and drink establishments (if NM Safe Certified): 75% of maximum capacity for indoor dining; 75% of maximum capacity for outdoor dining
Close-contact businesses: 75% of maximum capacity; no restrictions on outdoor spaces
Large entertainment venues: 33% of maximum capacity for any indoor/enclosed space on premises; 75% of any outdoor space on premises
Recreational facilities: 50% of maximum capacity of any indoor/enclosed space on the premises; 75% of any outdoor space on premises
Bars and clubs: 33% of maximum capacity of any indoor/enclosed space on premises; 75% of any outdoor space on premises, where applicable
**All other businesses: 75% of maximum capacity indoors; no restrictions on outdoor spaces
Houses of worship: May hold religious services, indoors or outdoors, or provide services through audiovisual means, but may not exceed 75% of the maximum capacity of any enclosed space on the premises
Places of lodging: No maximum occupancy restrictions for those that have completed NM Safe Certified training; 50% of maximum occupancy for all others; 15 guests maximum for vacation rentals
Mass gatherings limit: 150 persons, or 200 vehicles

GREEN LEVEL:

Counties at the Green Level have both a new COVID-19 case incidence rate of no greater than 8 cases per 100,000 inhabitants during the most recent two-week period, and an average percent of positive COVID-19 test results over the most recent 14-day period less than or equal to 5%.

Essential businesses (non-retail): No capacity restrictions but operations must be limited to only those absolutely necessary to carry out essential functions
Essential retail spaces: 50% of maximum capacity (indoor and outdoor)
Food and drink establishments (if NM Safe Certified): 50% of maximum capacity for indoor dining; 75% of maximum capacity for outdoor dining
Close-contact businesses: 50% of maximum capacity (indoor and outdoor)
Large entertainment venues: 25% of maximum capacity for any indoor/enclosed space on premises; 50% of any outdoor space on premises
Recreational facilities: 25% of maximum capacity of any indoor/enclosed space on the premises; 50% of any outdoor space on the premises
Bars and clubs: 25% of maximum capacity of any outdoor space on premises, where applicable; indoor not permitted
**All other businesses: 50% of maximum capacity (indoor and outdoor)
Houses of worship: May hold religious services, indoors or outdoors, or provide services through audiovisual means, but may not exceed 50% of the maximum capacity of any enclosed space on the premises
Places of lodging: 75% of maximum occupancy for those that have completed NM Safe Certified training; 40% of maximum occupancy for all others; 10 guests maximum for vacation rentals
Mass gatherings limit: 20 persons, 120 vehicles

YELLOW LEVEL:

Counties at the Yellow Level have either a new COVID-19 case incidence rate of no greater than 8 cases per 100,000 inhabitants during the most recent two-week period, or an average percent of positive COVID-19 test results over the most recent 14-day period less than or equal to 5%.

Essential businesses (non-retail): No capacity restrictions but operations must be limited to only those absolutely necessary to carry out essential functions
Essential retail spaces: 33% of maximum capacity (indoor and outdoor)
Food and drink establishments (if NM Safe Certified): 25% of maximum capacity for indoor dining; 75% of maximum capacity for outdoors dining; any establishment serving alcohol must close by 10 p.m. each night
Close-contact businesses: 33% of maximum capacity or 20 customers at one time, whichever is smaller; 33% of any outdoor space on the premises
Large entertainment venues: 25% of maximum capacity of any outdoor space on premises; indoor not permitted with the limited exception of operating up to 25% of maximum capacity for recording and broadcasting entertainment without any in-person audience
Recreational facilities: 33% of any outdoor space on the premises; indoor not permitted
Bars and clubs: May not operate
**All other businesses: 33% of maximum capacity (indoor and outdoor)
Houses of worship: May hold religious services, indoors or outdoors, or provide services through audiovisual means, but may not exceed 33% of the maximum capacity of any enclosed space on the premises
Places of lodging: 60% of maximum occupancy for those that have completed NM Safe Certified training; 25% of maximum occupancy for all others; 5 guests maximum for vacation rentals
Mass gatherings limit: 10 persons; 80 vehicles

RED LEVEL:

Counties at the Red Level are those with a new COVID-19 case incident rate of greater than 8 cases per 100,000 inhabitants during the most recent two-week period and an average percent of positive COVID-19 test results over the most recent 14-day period greater than 5%.

Essential businesses (non-retail): No capacity restrictions but must limit operations to only those absolutely necessary to carry out essential functions
Essential retail spaces: 25% of maximum capacity (indoor and outdoor)
Food and drink establishments: No indoor dining permitted; 25% of maximum capacity for outdoor dining; any establishment serving alcohol must close by 9 p.m. each night
Close-contact businesses: 25% of maximum capacity or 10 customers at one time, whichever is smaller; 25% of any outdoor space on the premises
Large entertainment venues: May not operate
Recreational facilities: 25% of maximum capacity of any outdoor space on the premises; indoor not permitted
Bars and clubs: May not operate
**All other businesses: 25% of maximum capacity (indoor and outdoor)
Houses of worship: May hold religious services, indoors or outdoors, or provide services through audiovisual means, but may not exceed 25% of the maximum capacity of any enclosed space on the premises
Places of lodging: 40% of maximum occupancy for those that have completed NM Safe Certified training; 25% of maximum occupancy for all others; 5 guests maximum for vacation rentals
Mass gatherings limit: 5 persons, 40 vehicles


Categories and definitions within the public health order:

Essential businesses (non-retail): These are any business or nonprofit entity falling within one or more of the following categories:
Health care operations including hospitals, walk-in-care health facilities, pharmacies, medical wholesale and distribution, home health care workers or aides for the elderly, emergency dental facilities, nursing homes, residential health care facilities, research facilities, congregate care facilities, intermediate care facilities for those with intellectual or developmental disabilities, supportive living homes, home health care providers, drug and alcohol recovery support services, and medical supplies and equipment manufacturers and providers;
Homeless shelters, food banks, and other services providing care to indigent or needy populations;
Childcare facilities;
Farms, ranches, and other food cultivation, processing, or packaging operations;
Infrastructure operations including, but not limited to, public works construction, commercial and residential construction and maintenance, self-storage facilities, airport operations, public transportation, airlines, taxis, private transportation providers, transportation network companies, water, gas, electrical, oil drilling, oil refining, natural resources extraction or mining operations, nuclear material research and enrichment, those attendant to the repair and construction of roads and highways, gas stations, solid waste collection and removal, trash and recycling collection, processing and disposal, sewer, data and internet providers, data centers, technology support operations, and telecommunications systems;
Manufacturing operations involved in food processing, manufacturing agents, chemicals, fertilizer, pharmaceuticals, sanitary products, household paper products, microelectronics/semiconductor, primary metals manufacturers, electrical equipment, appliance, and component manufacturers, and transportation equipment manufacturers;
Services necessary to maintain the safety and sanitation of residences or essential businesses including security services, towing services, custodial services, plumbers, electricians, and other skilled trades;
Veterinary and livestock services, animal shelters and facilities providing pet adoption, daycare, or boarding services;
Media services;
Utilities, including their contractors, suppliers, and supportive operations, engaged in power generation, fuel supply and transmission, water and wastewater supply;
Crematoriums, funeral homes and cemeteries;
Banks, credit unions, insurance providers, payroll services, brokerage services, and investment management firms;
Businesses providing mailing and shipping services;
Laboratories and defense and national security-related operations supporting the United States government, a contractor to the United States government, or any federal entity;
Professional services, such as legal or accounting services, but only where necessary to assist in compliance with legally mandated activities; and
Logistics, and also businesses that store, transport, or deliver groceries, food, materials, goods or services directly to residences, retailers, government institutions, or essential businesses.
Essential retail spaces: These include grocery stores, supermarkets, food banks, farmers’ markets and vendors who sell food, convenience stores, and other businesses that generate more than one-third of their revenue from the sale of canned food, dry goods, fresh fruits and vegetables, pet food, animal feed or supplies, fresh meats, fish, and poultry, and any other consumable food and drink products; automobile repair facilities, bike repair facilities, and retailers who generate the majority of their revenue from the sale of automobile or bike repair products; hardware stores; laundromats; and dry cleaner services.

Food and drink establishments: These are restaurants, breweries, wineries, distillers, cafes, coffee shops, or other similar establishments that offer food or drink.

Close-contact businesses: These are barbershops, hair salons, tattoo parlors, nail salons, spas, massage therapy services, esthetician clinics and tanning salons.

Recreational facilities: These are any publicly or privately owned facility typically or actually used for recreational activities capable of bringing persons within close proximity of one another, including aquariums, amusement parks, arcades, basketball courts, baseball fields, bowling alleys, botanical gardens, family entertainment centers, football fields, go-kart courses, golf courses, ice-skating rinks, museums with interactive displays or exhibits, miniature golf courses, ski areas, soccer fields, swimming pools, tennis courts, youth programs, guided raft tours, guided balloon tours and zoos.

Bars and clubs: These are any business that typically or actually generates more than half of its revenue from the sale of alcohol for on-premises consumption – including adult entertainment venues, nightclubs, and dance clubs, regardless of the source of their revenue.

Large entertainment venues: These are as any publicly or privately owned venue typically or actually used to host large audiences for the purposes of entertainment or amusement, including racetracks, concert venues, movie theaters, performance venues, professional sports venues and theaters.

Houses of worship: These are any church, synagogue, mosque, or other gathering space where persons congregate to exercise their religious beliefs.

Places of lodging: These are hotels, motels, RV parks, and short-term vacation rentals.

Mass gatherings: These are any public gathering, private gathering, organized event, ceremony, parade, funeral, or any other grouping that brings together a specified number of individuals in a single room or connected space, confined outdoor space, or open outdoor space. “Mass gatherings” also include coordinated events in which individuals gather in vehicles. “Mass gatherings” do not include the presence of any number of individuals where those individuals regularly reside. “Mass gathering” does not include individuals who are public officials or public employees in the course and scope of their employment.

**All other businesses: These are any entities that are not identified explicitly as an “essential business,” “house of worship,” “recreational facility,” “large entertainment venue,” “food and drink establishment,” “bars or clubs” or “place of lodging”.” Examples would include non-essential retail spaces like a clothing store, a gym, a group fitness class or a personal training service, among others.

February 25, 2021 7:15 AM

New Mexico COVID-19 update: 448 new cases, totaling 183,781
Fourteen additional COVID-19 deaths

SANTA FE – New Mexico state health officials on Wednesday announced 448 additional COVID-19 cases. Per the state Department of Health, the most recent cases are:

105 new cases in Bernalillo County
19 new cases in Chaves County
10 new cases in Cibola County
3 new cases in Colfax County
4 new cases in Curry County
1 new case in De Baca County
70 new cases in Doña Ana County
100 new cases in Eddy County
1 new case in Grant County
1 new case in Hidalgo County
7 new cases in Lea County
7 new cases in Lincoln County
1 new case in Los Alamos County
4 new cases in Luna County
3 new cases in McKinley County
7 new cases in Mora County
17 new cases in Otero County
8 new cases in Rio Arriba County
4 new cases in Roosevelt County
14 new cases in Sandoval County
11 new cases in San Juan County
4 new cases in San Miguel County
14 new cases in Santa Fe County
13 new cases in Sierra County
4 new cases in Socorro County
6 new cases in Taos County
1 new case in Torrance County
1 new case in Union County
6 new cases in Valencia County
2 new cases among New Mexico Corrections Department inmates at the Lea County Correctional Facility

The Department of Health on Wednesday reported fourteen additional deaths in New Mexico related to COVID-19:

A female in her 70s from Bernalillo County. The individual had underlying conditions.
A female in her 80s from Bernalillo County.
A male in his 70s from Cibola County. The individual had underlying conditions and was a resident of the Good Samaritan Society in Grants.
A male in his 50s from Lea County.
A female in her 80s from Lincoln County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.
A male in his 70s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.
A female in her 80s from Rio Arriba County. The individual had underlying conditions.
A male in his 60s from Sandoval County. The individual was hospitalized.
A female in her 70s from Sandoval County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.
A male in his 80s from San Juan County. The individual was hospitalized.
A male in his 60s from Santa Fe County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.
A male in his 80s from Santa Fe County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.
A female in her 90s from Santa Fe County. The individual was hospitalized.
A male in his 70s from Valencia County. The individual had underlying conditions.

The number of deaths of New Mexico residents related to COVID-19 is now 3,658.

The ten ZIP codes across the state with the most COVID-19 cases on Wednesday, Feb. 24 are:

88210 - 69
88220 - 23
87105 - 16
87114 - 13
88005 - 12
88012 - 12
88001 - 11
88310 - 11
88201 - 10
87120 - 9

Daily case counts and test numbers are raw data based on information the state receives today - meaning data that has not yet been scrutinized to identify potential duplicates or late-arriving positives or negatives. By contrast, the Red Yellow Green county-level analysis provides a highly accurate picture for a two-week period of time.

Previously reported numbers included two cases that have been identified as duplicates (one in Bernalillo County and one in Doña Ana County)-- these have now been corrected. Including the above newly reported cases, New Mexico has now had a total of 183,781 COVID-19 cases:

Bernalillo County: 52,129
Catron County: 83
Chaves County: 8,590
Cibola County: 2,728
Colfax County: 699
Curry County: 4,898
De Baca County: 132
Doña Ana County: 22,570
Eddy County: 6,404
Grant County: 1,462
Guadalupe County: 349
Harding County: 8
Hidalgo County: 346
Lea County: 8,009
Lincoln County: 1,527
Los Alamos County: 476
Luna County: 3,083
McKinley County: 11,989
Mora County: 161
Otero County: 3,247
Quay County: 418
Rio Arriba County: 3,388
Roosevelt County: 1,835
Sandoval County: 10,802
San Juan County: 13,488
San Miguel County: 1,222
Santa Fe County: 9,545
Sierra County: 698
Socorro County: 1,215
Taos County: 1,509
Torrance County: 631
Union County: 237
Valencia County: 6,112

County totals are subject to change upon further investigation and determination of residency of individuals positive for COVID-19.

The Department of Health currently reports the following numbers of COVID-19 cases among individuals held by federal agencies at the following facilities:

Cibola County Correctional Center: 444
Otero County Federal Prison Facility: 443
Otero County Processing Center: 197
Torrance County Detention Facility: 47

The Department of Health currently reports the following numbers of COVID-19 cases among individuals held by the New Mexico Corrections Department at the following facilities:

Central New Mexico Correctional Facility in Valencia County: 287
Guadalupe County Correctional Facility: 251
Lea County Correctional Facility: 474
Northeast New Mexico Correctional Facility in Union County: 166
Northwest New Mexico Correctional Center in Cibola County: 123
Otero County Prison Facility: 472
Penitentiary of New Mexico in Santa Fe County: 215
Roswell Correctional Center: 229
Southern New Mexico Correctional Facility in Doña Ana County: 218
Springer Correctional Center in Colfax County: 151
Western New Mexico Correctional Facility in Cibola County: 74

As of today, there are 251 individuals hospitalized in New Mexico for COVID-19. This number may include individuals who tested positive for COVID-19 out of state but are currently hospitalized in New Mexico. This number does not include New Mexicans who tested positive for COVID-19 and may have been transferred to a hospital out of state.

As of today, there are 137,250 COVID-19 cases designated as having recovered by the New Mexico Department of Health.

The Department of Health has identified at least one positive COVID-19 case in residents and/or staff in the past 28 days at the following long-term care facilities:

Adobe Assisted Living in Las Cruces
Advanced Health Care in Albuquerque
The Aldea House – Heaven Sent LLC in Albuquerque
Artesia Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center in Artesia
Atria Vista Del Rio in Albuquerque
Avamere at Rio Rancho
BeeHive Homes Edgewood
BeeHive Homes Gallup
BeeHive Homes Taylor Ranch in Albuquerque
Bloomfield Nursing and Rehabilitation in Bloomfield
Brookdale Santa Fe
Calibre Sagecrest Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Las Cruces
Care Free Assisted Living in Albuquerque
Carefirst Assisted Living Willow Wood House in Albuquerque
Casa Arena Blanca Nursing Center in Alamogordo
Casa de Oro Center in Las Cruces
Clovis Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center in Clovis
Colfax Long-Term Care Center in Springer
Fort Bayard Medical Center in Santa Clara
Genesis Silver City Care Center in Silver City
Golden Hands Assisted Living in Albuquerque
Good Life Senior Living in Carlsbad
Good Samaritan Society – Betty Dare in Alamogordo
Good Samaritan Society Socorro
Ladera Center in Albuquerque
Laguna Rainbow Care Center in Casa Blanca
Lakeview Christian Home in Carlsbad
Landmark at Desert Gardens in Hobbs
La Posada Assisted Living in Las Cruces
Las Palomas Center in Albuquerque
The Legacy at Santa Fe
Life Spire Assisted Living North Albuquerque Acres in Albuquerque
McKinley Center in Gallup
Mimbres Memorial Nursing Home in Deming
Mission Arch Center in Roswell
MorningStar Assisted Living and Memory Care of Albuquerque
The Neighborhood in Rio Rancho Assisted Living in Rio Rancho
North Ridge Assisted Living in Albuquerque
Odelia Healthcare (Camino Healthcare) in Albuquerque
Princeton Place in Albuquerque
Ravenna Assisted Living in Albuquerque
Retirement Ranches in Clovis
The Rio at Las Estancias in Albuquerque
Rio Rancho Center
Sandia Ridge Center in Albuquerque
Sandia Senior Suites Assisted Living in Albuquerque
Santa Clara Assisted Living in Santa Clara
Sierra Health Care Center in Truth or Consequences
Skies Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center in Albuquerque
Sombrillo Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Los Alamos
The Suites at Rio Vista in Rio Rancho
Tercer Cielo 2 in Albuquerque
Village Retirement Community in Roswell
Vida Encantada Nursing & Rehabilitation in Las Vegas
Vista Sandia Assisted Living in Albuquerque
Welbrook Senior Living in Las Cruces
White Sands Healthcare in Hobbs

The Department of Health has detected community spread in the state of New Mexico and is investigating cases with no known exposure. The agency reports that given the infectious nature of the virus it is likely other residents are infected but yet to be tested or confirmed positive. To that end, all New Mexicans have been instructed to stay home except for outings absolutely necessary for health, safety and welfare. These additional restrictions have been enacted to aggressively minimize person-to-person contact and ensure spread is mitigated. New Mexicans are strongly urged to limit travel to only what is necessary for health, safety and welfare.

The New Mexico Department of Health has active investigations into the positive patients, which includes contact-tracing and swabs of symptomatic individuals who have had contact with the positive cases.

Every New Mexican must work together to stem the spread of COVID-19. Stay home, especially if you are sick. Wear a mask or face covering when in public and around others.

New Mexicans who report symptoms of COVID-19 infection, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, and/or loss of taste or smell should call their health care provider or the NMDOH COVID-19 hotline immediately (1-855-600-3453).

The Department of Health strongly encourages the following groups to get tested:
Symptomatic people displaying the COVID-19 symptoms of fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, and/or loss of taste or smell;
Asymptomatic people who are close contacts or household members of people in their infectious period who have already tested positive for the coronavirus;
Asymptomatic people who live or work in congregate settings such as long-term care facilities and group homes;
Patients who are scheduled for surgery and whose provider has advised them to get tested before the procedure.

New Mexicans who have non-health-related questions or concerns can also call 833-551-0518 or visit newmexico.gov, which is being updated regularly as a one-stop source for information for families, workers and others affected by and seeking more information about COVID-19.